In this newsletter

Busy couple of week ahead. There are practice exams for our students intending to sit NCEA externals happening this week and a new block at the Unlimited Campus beginning the week after that.

 

Upcoming Events

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Term 3, Week 5: Starting Monday 20 August 2018
  • Monday 20 August – 24 August: NCEA Practice Exams, Unlimited Campus
  • Monday 20 August, 6pm: EOTC Session, Discovery Campus
  • Wednesday 22 August, 8.30am: Breakfast Club, Kitchen, Unlimited Campus
Term 3, Week 6: Starting Monday 27 August 2018
  • Monday 27 August: Term 3.2 begins, Unlimited Campus
  • Wednesday 29 August, 8.30am: Breakfast Club, Kitchen, Unlimited Campus
  • Thursday 30 August, 7-8.30pm: Dance Showcase, Unlimited Campus
  • Sunday 2 September: Newsletter published

 

 

 

Messages

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Message from Steven

Property update

This week I’m looking forward to accompanying the BOT on their first walk through the site.  Last week I took a photo from the bus exchange (see below) and you can see the beginnings of a roof. It’s also a good shot to show you just how close to the bus exchange we will be.  Every time I go there I’m amazed at how rapidly our facilities are taking shape and how much of a statement our building makes in the CBD right now.  In time other buildings will appear in front of us but for now we are the dominant presence in that area.

I also met with the city council’s traffic planning team on Friday to start working on developing a travel plan for our school.  This work requires us to work with council on how as a community will we manage our students, staff and families as they travel to and from school.  There are likely to be surveys, a working group and other opportunities for you to support me in developing this plan.  I also hope that once the plan is finished, it will help our current and new families establish new routines for our new location, while also answering some of your wonderings around how you could do it.

CCC 30km Submissions

The City Council is now consulting on reducing the speed for St Asaph Street to 30kph.

Below is a link to the online consultation and submission form.

https://ccc.govt.nz/the-council/consultations-and-submissions/haveyoursay/show/177

It’s quite brief (it took me about 5 minutes to read the info and make my submission).

Submissions close 4 September.

I strongly support a move to 30kph along St Asaph Street.  Reducing the speed outside our facilities will provide a safer environment for our children (aged 5 to 18), their families and our staff.  Roads outside schools can be dangerous for children particularly when children are arriving at or leaving school or crossing the road. This is particularly true on a street where there is a high volume of traffic and cars may be picking up and dropping off children. Coupled with this is the research that shows reducing vehicle speeds to 40km/h or less significantly reduces the level of injury if a child is struck by a vehicle.

I would love to see every member of our community make a submission supporting this initiative.

Steven Mustor – Director

Message from Niki

Primary School Teacher’s Strike

We supported the strike on Wednesday by having a shared morning tea for the students and those parents who could make it. HB Hawk did a great job of organising the food and decorating the Shared Space with bunting. It was so cool for LAs to read some of the comments kids and parents made about the positive effects we have in your lives. Of course, that’s not why we do our job, but it did make us smile to know we are appreciated:-)

Cans for Good

Thank you so much for your support of this initiative. We collected enough tins to write AO TAWHITI in cans, please see Libby’s post for photos.

Acronyms explained!

Here at At Tawhiti Unlimited Discovery we have the odd acronym. On Monday I am running an EOTC session at 6pm in the Shared Space on the Discovery campus. This acronym stand for Education Outside The Classroom, and anyone wishing to take students out of school on a trip/ PIN are required to attend the session. There will be another session on Wednesday 22 August at 9am, also in the Shared Space.PINs stands for Passions, Interests and Needs. You should have received the workshop descriptors and a link to complete the form. There is heaps to choose from, and we are incredibly grateful to those who have offered to run workshops. Please complete choices ASAP so I can let those wonderful people who are running workshops know who to expect.SLW may be a new acronym, taking over from CLW. Student Led Workshops (used to be Child-Led Workshops) happen every Friday afternoon. If you haven’t been around on a Friday afternoon for a while come and hang out. The atmosphere is awesome with all children engaged in something fun, with some students showing leadership and others learning new skills.

Dental van

The van is set to visit school sometime this term. We will let you know for sure when we know. Geraldine Smyth from the Community Dental Service presented to LAs last week about what they do and how we can support them. The main message for parents is that if you do not want your child to visit the van/ have any treatment you must let them know. Call them 0800 846 983/ email commdental@cdhd.health.nz.  Please see the attached letter for further information.

Niki Stephenson – Deputy Director

Message from Ian

Well we’re nearly through half of Term 3 … this year is just flying by.

We have locked in a couple of dates for our upcoming Celebrations of Learning. The first one is the 21st of September… We will be holding this one in the Jack Mann Auditorium on the Unlimited Campus again. We are thinking a 6pm kick off again. We will be running it in a similar style to last term’s one. Some static displays of Student Learning and some performances, or sharing, in the Auditorium. We’ll definitely be sending more information out about this as it gets a bit closer. However, pop the date in your calendars. If you want to share, display or present something at the COL, please use the following link to enter your item…

https://docs.google.com/forms/d/e/1FAIpQLSdyl2ECXzXXMw0WsXSuY8utjL2W4If3GL5HsvdjmrP5zlQRYQ/viewform

The Term 4 date for Celebration of Learning is Friday 30 November (T4 week 7). The location and time for this has yet to be decided. But you can definitely enter the date into your calendars.

As mentioned a few times over the year in the newsletter we had a group of students fundraise last year to purchase a Time Lapse camera to record the development of our new building in the CBD. These students also took advantage of the school’s Student Innovation Fund. This fund allows any students to propose a project and ask the students who manage the fund to consider whether it’s worth spending some of the school’s budget on. This is a great opportunity for students who have a cool idea but may not have enough funds to get it off the ground. The following link will take you to the most recent footage from the site that the camera has recorded. It’s super exciting to see how far this project has come along and how close we are getting to the reality of moving in.

http://aotawhiti.school.nz/new-building-latest-time-lapse-2/

Thanks

Ian Hayes – Deputy Director

Message from Duncan

It’s that time of year again!

Recently I met with the year 11 – 13 students to outline with them a number of things to be aware of. Believe it or not graduation is fast approaching and we are now beginning our preparation for it. I have sent year 12 and 13 students a link to this form. It asks if they are intending to graduate, would like a hoodie etc. The due to date for completing it is September 22. Please encourage your year 12 and 13 students to complete this ASAP.

Year 14

We are hearing in the wind that there are a number of current year 13s considering returning for a year 14. It is important that you know there are limited spaces for this (5 maximum). If a student wishes to return for year 14 we will be interviewing them. There are certain criteria they will need to meet. They will need a Defined goal, good attendance, and there will be an expectation they contribute to the school. Year 14 is not something that just rolls over. Please make sure any year 13s who are considering this are well aware that there is no guarantee and that they should be actively looking for alternative options should year 14 not be an option.

Student Leadership

Student Leadership is something I would like to focus on and develop as we move into the new school. I believe our senior students have a pivotal role in supporting a positive school culture and that they are passionate about doing this. Any year current year 11 and 12 students who would like to be involved in becoming a student leader we would like you to attend a meeting in S1 on Friday August 31.

Practice exams

Practice exams are this week with our 11 – 13s on study leave it will feel a bit quieter on Campus. Wednesday particularly so as Kay’s community are off skiing! Practice exams are an important part of the the program for our senior students and the exams should be taken seriously. If for any reason a student was unable to sit the final exams the practice exams can be used to support a derived grade.

Have a great week!

Duncan Woods – Deputy Director

 

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Schoolwide Notices

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Ski Trips

Once again we had a perfect day on the slopes. Last week we took over 30 students aged from 5 years -18 years.  I personally really enjoyed the opportunity to be together as one school and students to have a real opportunity to get to know new people.

We also had a total mix of complete beginners and real experts. It was lovely watching two complete beginners sticking together and supporting each other all day even though one was 11years old and the other 17 years old.

If you haven’t already had the opportunity to join us then you have about 4 chances left depending on the conditions. We are now taking names for the next two trips. Please do this ASAP as I will have to make a call on numbers pretty soon. Please note that the Wednesday the 29th August trip is a very early start. This is because we can only have early lessons that day.

Ski Trip 29th Aug – Earlier Start!!

Ski Trip 5th Sept

Kay Hayes – Community Leader

 

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1-6 News

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Cafe – 28 August

Tilly-Rose – Student

Hawk Trip to the CBD

Gina Harrison – Learning Advisor

Cans For Good

Libby Boyd – Learning Advisor

Strike Report

 

Gina Harrison – Learning Advisor

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7-13 News

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Jute Bags

Noah Mckay – Student

Swimming achievement

Nico recently competed at the South Island Swimming champs. He took the win in the multi class for both the 100m freestyle and 100m breaststroke.

Congratulations Nico, keep up the outstanding work J

Kelsey Berryman – Sports Coordinator

45PE at Howzat and YMCA

Students from Ao Tawhiti Unlimited Discovery have always been great at using community resources to enhance their learning. This has been evident in PE as much as any other subject area. Currently we have great relationships with Howzat Indoor Riccarton and Bishopdale YMCA. Our PE classes visit these places twice a week and have access to great resources.

This photo shows our students developing their badminton skills at Bishopdale YMCA. In the near court Jack Pearce is setting up for one of his lethal smash shots!

Steve Hunt – Learning Advisor

Dance Showcase

Sarah Marshall – Community Leader

NCEA PRACTICE EXAM WEEK

Practice exams take place on the week of 20th August. During this week no NCEA classes will be running. Students in Year 11, 12, 13 have study leave and should only come to school for specific exam sessions.

Year 9s and 10s who are sitting exams are allowed two days study leave prior to each of their exam sessions. Otherwise they must attend school.

Please check that your students know the times of their exam sessions, and that they are organized to arrive at school at least 20 minutes before their exam starts. Students assemble outside S5 for their exams.

Brent Silby – NZQA Principal’s Nominee

Impact Projects

Last Friday Ruby and I ran a school disco at the Discovery campus. This was our impact project. Our goal was to raise money for a cancer charity. Thanks to everyone who came along. Thanks to our parents for baking, and thanks to Otis for selling the baking. A big thanks to Kay and Mel who helped co-ordinate everything. We would also like to thank New World Halswell for donating the raffle prize pack.

** Congratulations to Shae Robinet who won the raffle **

We can’t wait to bring you our next fundraising project.

bty

Livy Silby – Student

The Oaks Retirement Village

Ryan Ruscoe is passionate about animal welfare. He has worked with the SPCA to create a plan for providing them with knitted mice for their cats and kittens to play with, while they wait for their forever home. Ryan has teamed up with the good folk at The Oaks Retirement Village and their weekly ‘knit and natter’ group! Naima Derrick and Imogen Dombroski have joined the group to support Ryan and to add their expertise also. This intergenerational interaction has great benefits for all involved and is really fun to be a part of!

Steve Hunt – Learning Advisor

NCEA FEES

All students in Year 11 or above (and students in Year 10 with special arrangement) who are sitting NCEA must pay their annual NCEA fee by 24th August. The fee is $76.70 for the year. This can be reduced to $20 if you complete the financial assistance form (attached) and return to the office. Please pay to the school as soon as possible.

Brent Silby – NZQA Principal’s Nominee

Kay’s Community Newsletter

A.T. Projects

There is such an exciting feel about our community at the moment as so many projects are coming together and many are experiencing fabulous successes.  We have the fantastic Ao Tawhiti Jute bags available for sale now and the first 50 have already sold out!! Don’t worry more will be coming.

The Party for Cancer group held a superb disco on the Discovery Campus raising just over $300 for their chosen charities.

In just over a week we have another event happening that will include some of our years 5 and 6 students as well as some Year 7 -10’s . This is a 1920’s themed fun event to raise money for the Otakaro Orchard. 

Community Ski Trip Weds 22nd Aug

Keep your fingers crossed for good weather. The plan is to take about 50 students and 10 adults up to Mount Hutt this Wednesday. It should be a great community day.

Kay Hayes – Community Leader

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Other Notices

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Ministry of Health Information: Influenza

Influenza – or the flu – is a virus that spreads quickly from person to person. Symptoms include fever, chills, aches, runny nose, a cough and stomach upset. Immunisation is your best defence against the flu.

Summary

The influenza virus infects your nose, throat and lungs. The flu is normally worse than a cold.In temperate climates such as New Zealand’s, you’re more likely to get the flu in winter. Some people get very sick – influenza causes deaths every year.Symptoms of influenza come on suddenly and can include fever, chills, muscle aches, runny nose, cough and stomach upsets.Older people, young children, pregnant women, and people with certain medical conditions are at a higher risk of developing serious complications from influenza, such as pneumonia. If you’re at higher risk, it is important to see your doctor early, to find out if you need treatment.It is also important to seek medical advice early if you are concerned, and especially if there are any danger signs, even if you have been seen before. Other serious conditions can also look like the flu, including meningococcal disease.Immunisation is your best defence against influenza. Even fit and healthy people should consider getting the flu jab to protect themselves.The flu spreads quickly from person to person through touch and through the air.While you’re unwell, stay away from work or school. Look after yourself and your family – rest and fluids are especially important.Influenza can be caused by different strains of the influenza virus. (Symptoms for different types of flu are the same.) The seasonal influenza vaccine is altered most years to cover the particular strains of the virus that are circulating each year. When a new (novel) strain of the flu virus emerges that infects many people in a very short time, it is called a ‘flu pandemic’.

Symptoms

Signs and symptoms of influenza can include:

  • fever (a temperature of 38°C or higher)
  • cough
  • sore throat
  • runny or stuffy nose
  • body aches
  • headache
  • chills
  • stomach upset, vomiting or diarrhoea.

It may take between 1–4 days to feel symptoms after you catch influenza.The worst symptoms usually last about 5 days, but coughing can last up to 2–3 weeks.

High risk groups

People at higher risk of developing complications if they get influenza include:

  • pregnant women and women who have just given birth
  • people with an ongoing health condition (like asthma, diabetes, cancer, a heart or lung condition, and conditions that affect the nervous or immune systems)
  • significantly overweight people
  • people aged 65 years or over
  • very young children, especially infants (under 1 year).

If you are at higher risk, or are concerned about your symptoms, it is important to seek advice early from your doctor or Healthline (ph 0800 611 116), to see if you need treatment (even if you have been seen before).

Danger signs

Seek urgent medical advice if you have:

  • a high fever that doesn’t come down, especially if you are pregnant
  • chills or severe shaking
  • difficulty breathing or chest pain
  • purple or bluish discolouration of your lips, skin, fingers or toes
  • seizures or convulsions
  • signs of other serious conditions, such as meningococcal disease (which may include severe headache, sleepiness, vomiting, stiff neck, dislike of bright lights, and sometimes a rash).

Look out for signs of dehydration such as dizziness when standing, and not passing urine regularly.If a person you are caring for is less responsive than normal, unusually quiet, or confused, you should call a doctor urgently.It is also important to let your doctor know if you were starting to feel better, then get worse.

Danger signs for babies and young children

Call a doctor if your baby or child’s breathing is fast or noisy or if they are wheezing or grunting. Check if the area below the ribs sucks inward (instead of expanding as normal) as they breathe in.You should get help if your baby or child is:

  • very pale
  • drowsy or difficult to wake
  • severely irritable, not wanting to be held
  • limp or unable to move
  • if a baby has dry nappies or no tears when they are crying, it means they are dehydrated. It is important to contact a doctor
  • if they have signs of other serious conditions, such as meningococcal disease (which may include severe headache, stiff neck, dislike of bright lights, and sometimes a rash, but in very young children are often non-specific such as sleepiness and vomiting).

If you have any worries about yourself or someone you are caring for, call Healthline (0800 611 116) for advice or see a doctor, even if you have called or been seen before.

Treatment

Phone Healthline (0800 611 116) or your doctor if you are concerned or if you:

  • feel a lot worse, or you are not getting better after a few days
  • have an existing health condition or are in a high risk group (see Symptoms)
  • are pregnant
  • are taking any medication that affects the immune system
  • are looking after someone with influenza and you are in a high risk group

If clinically indicated, your doctor may recommend antiviral medications. Take them as directed.

Caring for yourself and others

If you are unwell, stay at home and rest ideally/preferably in a separate, well ventilated room away from other people.It is important to drink small amounts of fluids often.Antibiotics only work against bacterial infections, not the viral infections that cause influenza.Carefully read and follow the labels on any medication and contact your doctor or pharmacist if you have any questionsYou can also:

  • reduce fever by using a damp cloth on your forehead, washing the arms and body with a cool cloth, bathing in slightly warm water
  • take appropriate medicines to relieve discomfort and fever if necessary.
  • It is especially important to reduce fever if you are pregnant.
  • gargle a glass of warm water and/or suck sugarless hard sweets or lozenges to help with sore throats
  • shower or bathe regularly and keep bedding and nightwear clean and dry
  • use skin balm or moisturiser to stop your lips from cracking.

Know the danger signs that mean you should seek urgent medical attention (see Symptoms).Any child younger than 3 months who has a fever should see a doctor

Caring for babies and children

When a baby or child has influenza, it is important to do the following:

  • keep the child at home resting until they are well.
  • care for the child in a separate, well-ventilated room away from other people.
  • increase the frequency of breastfeeding or the amount of other fluids they drink. If your child will not take fluids or is drowsy, don’t force them. Seek medical advice immediately.
  • reduce fever by using a damp cloth on their forehead, washing their arms and body with a cool cloth, bathing them in slightly warm water.
  • give paracetamol or ibuprofen if they have pain or discomfort in the dose recommended on the package (unless your doctor says otherwise). Aspirin should not be given to children under 14 years of age.

Saltwater drops (saline) can be used to treat a stuffy nose.

Prevention

The influenza virus spreads very quickly from person to person through touch as well as through the air.Immunisation is your best defence against influenza.

Immunisation

You can get the vaccine or ‘flu jab’ at your general practice or some pharmacies free you are over 65 or pregnant.  For others with medical conditions that put them at greater risk of influenza, such as diabetes or heart disease, the vaccine is free from general practices only.  These medical conditions are listed at the Fight Flu website.  For everyone else, influenza vaccination costs between $25 and $45 depending on the vaccine and provider. Some workplaces also offer a free immunisation programme for staff.The vaccine is usually available from mid to late March until the end of December, but is recommended before winter.  In 2018 the vaccine will be available from early April.The quadrivalent vaccines available in New Zealand during 2018 provide protection against:

  • A/Michigan/45/2015 (H1N1) – like virus
  • A/Singapore/INFIMH/16-0019/2016 (H3N2) – like virus (new strain)
  • B/Phuket/3073/2013 – like virus (new strain)
  • B/Brisbane/60/2008 – like virus

For more information, phone 0800 Immune (0800 466 863) or visit Fight Flu.

Immunisation if you’re pregnant

Pregnant women are strongly advised to be immunised as pregnancy places a woman at greater risk of complications from influenza.  Influenza immunisation is free for pregnant women between March and the end of December, but is recommended before winter if possible.Mothers who receive the influenza vaccine while pregnant can pass protection on to their baby. The vaccine offers protection to infants who would normally be too young (under 6 months) to receive immunisation individually.Visit the Fight Flu website for facts about immunising against the flu when you are pregnant.

Stop the spread of the flu

If you are unwell, stay at home until you are better.Follow basic hygiene practices:

  • Wash your hands regularly for at least 20 seconds and dry them for 20 seconds – or use an alcohol-based hand rub.
  • Avoid touching your eyes, nose and mouth.
  • Don’t share drinks.
  • Avoid crowded places.
  • Cover your mouth and nose with a tissue when you cough or sneeze – then put the tissue in a lined bin.

Being prepared for a pandemic

Have a plan and be prepared in case you need to stay at home during a pandemic.Keep at least a week’s supply of food, tissues, and your usual medicines so you don’t need to make trips out in public.Make sure you have contact details for friends/family/neighbours so you can call them if you need help.Think about:

  • working from home
  • who could look after your extended family if they don’t live nearby (eg, who could deliver groceries or meals to sick family members)
  • organising child care if your children need to stay home and you must go to work.

If you have an existing medical condition:

  • make sure you don’t run out of regular medications
  • make sure you take medications for any condition to keep them under good control.

Summary

The influenza virus infects your nose, throat and lungs. The flu is normally worse than a cold.In temperate climates such as New Zealand’s, you’re more likely to get the flu in winter. Some people get very sick – influenza causes deaths every year.Symptoms of influenza come on suddenly and can include fever, chills, muscle aches, runny nose, cough and stomach upsets.Older people, young children, pregnant women, and people with certain medical conditions are at a higher risk of developing serious complications from influenza, such as pneumonia. If you’re at higher risk, it is important to see your doctor early, to find out if you need treatment.It is also important to seek medical advice early if you are concerned, and especially if there are any danger signs, even if you have been seen before. Other serious conditions can also look like the flu, including meningococcal disease. Immunisation is your best defence against influenza. Even fit and healthy people should consider getting the flu jab to protect themselves.The flu spreads quickly from person to person through touch and through the air.While you’re unwell, stay away from work or school. Look after yourself and your family – rest and fluids are especially important.Influenza can be caused by different strains of the influenza virus. (Symptoms for different types of flu are the same.) The seasonal influenza vaccine is altered most years to cover the particular strains of the virus that are circulating each year. When a new (novel) strain of the flu virus emerges that infects many people in a very short time, it is called a ‘flu pandemic’.

Frances Ryan – Public Health Nurse

 

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